You’ve got a friend in me

Happppppy March! Does anyone else feel like the months fly by once you reach adulthood?

adulthood-sucks

At the end of every month I find myself asking, “what did I accomplish this month?” I don’t necessarily mean just at work – but what did I do to make myself happy, what did I do to take care of myself? I decided every day, for as long as I can remember, I’ll write down what I felt was an accomplishment that day to help alleviate this frustration. TBD on if this was a good idea.

Tonight I’m adding a bit of the script focused on friendships, which I’ve found myself thinking a lot about these days. There are certain friendships that I really valued and recently realized I wasn’t sure why; others, I thought we were really close and it turns out the other person felt differently. Friendships have been challenged by distance and other life events, certainly something I’ve discovered in adulthood. It helps you realize who is really there for you – through the good and bad – and will rejoice in your successes, comfort you in sadness and really challenge you to be your best self. In today’s world I’ve realized that life is fleeting, so you might as well be the best f*ing friend you can while you still have time.

Enter scene. At Meredith’s house for family dinner.

GEORGE

Guys, c’mon the dinner is ready! Alex, Izzy, Christina, Meredith! So nice of you to join us this evening, Lexie.

LEXIE

Well thanks, Meredith invited me. (Turns and looks at Meredith) When you said George was cooking, I just couldn’t resist. You don’t strike me as a Bobby Flay type.

GEORGE

I’ll not be offended by that comment and simply ask well, how is it?

LEXIE

You know, if medicine weren’t your thing cooking might be. It’s great, really. It reminds me of my mom’s famous spaghetti! (Awkward pause)

CHRISTINA

Sooooooooo….how was everybody’s day at work today? Who killed someone?

IZZY

Ohh! Me first, me first! Okay, so today Dr. Hann and I worked on a woman who had cardiomyopathy. Generally, this isn’t a big thing because most people can go their lives without realizing they even have it. But lucky for us, her enlarged heart muscle caused an endocarditic infarction.

ALL

Ohhhh! Ahhhhh! (Dramatically)

IZZY

I know, I KNOW. So we performed a myectomy – we removed a portion of the enlarged muscle from the septum, resulting in a widened outflow blood tract and relived the obstruction.

GEORGE
Well if that isn’t a daymaker – congrats!

IZZY

Thank you, thank you. I’d like to take a moment to thank the academy, my loving parents…

GEORGE

Well obviously nothing for me because I’m just the lowly intern, remember? I do lame stuff and follow your orders.

MEREDITH

Nonsense, George. You do a great job, and we appreciate you for doing our lame stuff and following our “orders.” Lexie – you?

LEXIE

Actually, surprisingly uplifting. A kid came in today with thrombophlebitis. Her legs had some mobility, but her swollen veins were causing her so much pain. We caught it early, so there was no pulmonary consequences or anything. We gave her some warafin so it’s all good. And I was helping Dr. Scott in a the neonatal area. I helped with an ultrasound screening and my patient is expecting triplets! Girls!

MEREDITH

Wow, that’s really rare. I hope they turn out ok.

CHRISTINA

Okay my turn already. My day was not so eventful. I diagnosed a patient with chronic venous insufficiency, something that totally could have been done in a doctor’s office. but the bright side is, I did get to repair a severed arm! Not the same patient, of course.

IZZY

Ugh, you have a strange sense for excitement.

CHRISTINA

Well, when you you get your post taken away as Dr. Hann’s right-hand man, the simple things in medicine are enjoyable. (Glares at Izzy)

IZZY

Alright, whoa I did not steal that position from you. Sorry I’m awesome and charismatic?

CHRISTINA

Yes, yes you did! You totally just stole it right out from under my feet!

MEREDITH

Alright, ladies, LADIES! Cut it out. This is family dinner, not a WWE Smack Down.

GEORGE

Word. Ok Meredith, you’re up.

(Knock at the door interrupts her answer)

MEREDITH

Hang on, be right back (walks to front door)

(Opens the door to find Dr. Derek Shepherd standing at her door, smiling)

MEREDITH

Hi?

DEREK

Hey! I’m sorry I didn’t see you all day, it was crazy. So many patients…who knew so many neurological issues existed? Anyways, want to catch a movie for something? or down a bottle of tequila?

MEREDITH

(Looks mischievously at him) Sure, I just finished dinner. Why don’t you come in a sec while I grab my coat?

(They step inside. A chorus of hello’s come from Christina, Lexie, George and Izzy. Meredith and Derek exit, bidding all goodbyes. They link arms as they walk down the sidewalk to the car.)

End of Scene VI

That’s all for now, folks! Peace, love and friendship 🙂

Advertisements

Love is a Battlefield

I’m sure I left everyone on the edge of their seats after last post’s riveting first part to the Grey’s Anatomy episode. Well, you’re in luck because I still have many lines left in this old creative writing assignment.

If you’re just tuning in, I recently found my old creative writing portfolio from when I took the class in high school. Might as well share it with the world.

c66d31e588334f1dd659b8cd662030a1

FADE IN

Int. Meredith’s house – night

IZZY

So, how was work today?

GEORGE

Well, I did a lot of sutures today fixed a broken arm and told someone they had AIDS.

IZZY

Nice, I bet that was fun. Just what you hope for on a Monday morning, amirite?

GEORGE

Loads. How about you? Your day as enthralling as mine?

IZZY

Eh, ok I guess. I helped Dr. Hann again today in open heart surgery. The patient had coronary artery disease, along with high blood pressure. We had to be careful not to raise the blood pressure while doing a coronary angioplasty. The patient also had severe atherosclerosis, which looks as disgusting as it sounds up close. You’d think I’d be over the moon, dancing around the house happy I got to do something like that. But, I just don’t think my heart is in it – no pun intended.

GEORGE

Aw, it’s okay. (Holding hands) you’ll find your niche.

IZZY

Another day, another worry. So anyways, how’s the Callie controversy going?

GEORGE

Well, it’s a little rough. Yesterday I ran into her during rounds and I thought she was going to murder me right then and there. Fortunately, her interns were following her, so murder would have been a little inappropriate.

IZZY

Agreed. I thought you said she forgave you…

GEORGE

That’s what I thought to. But those murder eyes told a different story.

IZZY

Well she’s just going to have to get over it! Okay, so you’re not married anymore, big deal!! Callie and George are no longer. What does she want you to do, take her back?

GEORGE

Honestly, I’m not sure. I guessed it might be a little awkward going back to work being mad at one another. I need to find a way to get back in her good graces, that doesn’t involve re-marrying her.

IZZY

Good luck with that. Sorry, but I think I ruined it for you.

GEORGE

Thanks, Iz. Don’t worry, I’ll find a way.

IZZY

And George is on a mission again.

FADE TO:

A.) George following Callie, being somewhat of a teacher’s pet.

B.) Meredith checking in on the sick children.

C.) Dr. Shepherd sitting at his desk contemplating his love situation.

D.) Once again, George chasing around Callie.

End of Scene IV

Ext. Dr. Shepherd’s office

MEREDITH (V.O)

These obstacles we are faced with can never be simple and easy. The answer is never just a yes or a no. It can be as complicated and intricate as a brain surgery or a relationship decision. As the great Bernice Johnson Reagon once said, “Life’s challenges are not supposed to paralyze you; they are supposed to help you discover you who are.”

DR. SHEPHERD

Let’s see, the patient was diagnosed with a motor neuron disease, progressing the destruction of cells controlling essential muscle activity. Unfortunately, there is no cure. I have to find some way to slow it. But I will, as always, try to help this man live comfortably for a while.

ROSE

How very noble of you.

DR. SHEPHERD

Someone is feeling fiesty this morning….not noble, that’s just my job. This is a tough situation. Most people with this disease don’t recover; they die. I personally want to help this man live. Now, what treatments do you suggest?

ROSE

This is some kind of test, isn’t it?

DR. SHEPHERD

Not at all, merely a consultation with a well-qualified nurse on a difficult situation. I would never test you.

ROSE

Okay, I’ll bite. Now first, I would prescribe the drug riluzole to prolong his life two to three months. Although, it doesn’t relieve the symptoms it will make his life longer. But that’s not what we’re aiming for, is it?

DR. SHEPHERD

No, that would be more of a last resort.

ROSE

Okay, next idea. We use….relaxants like baclofen, tizanidine and benzodiasepines for the spastic muscles. As for relieving the pain, I would go with anticonvulsants or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

DR. SHEPHERD

You know what? That’s exactly what I was thinking, only better!

ROSE

Years of education are finally coming in handy.

End of Scene V

 

Do you hear what I hear?

I recently found my portfolio from high school creative writing, and needless to say I was entertained. I went through each piece, with my teacher’s glowing comments, and couldn’t help but laugh at the themes. Therefore, I will begin sharing my wise words through the eyes of 17-year-old me.

My first piece is a riveting episode of none other than medical drama, Grey’s Anatomy. Before I actually realized my calling in life, I idealized a medical profession. I was eager to help others, and felt drawn to the intriguing and fast-paced life of a doctor or nurse.  However, I soon realized that I could not handle other’s blood, vomit or other bodily fluids which left me to pursue less nauseating paths. Sometimes I actually still consider going back to school to be a nurse, unsure if I could actually do it and more drawn to being real-life Meredith Grey.

Keep in mind I have no idea at which point I decided to write this episode, nor am I sure of the accuracy of the detailed context. I’ll post it in sections, because it’s a doozey. This fits in somewhere to the 292-episode saga that is our favorite show.

“Do you hear what I hear?”when-he-all-impresed

TEASER

FADE IN

Ext. Seattle Grace hospital morning

Meredith and Christina are reminiscing in an old intern hangout. Their pagers both sound and they race off into the emergency room. There, they find five sixth graders who were stabbed during a lock down at a school nearby. One, a little boy, recently visited the hospital to receive new ears due to a rare genetic disorder.

Int. back in the intern room – evening

CHRISTINA

So, rough afternoon huh? I feel really bad for those kids, especially that little boy. First, he has a really cool, rare genetic disorder where he has no ears. Then, he gets his ears and he’s stabbed six times. What a world we live in…

MEREDITH

Tell me about it. That boy is only 10 years old – he’s just a kid! Who on Earth is compelled to stab helpless sixth graders?

(There is a knock at the door. Dr. Derek Shepherd walks in.)

DR. SHEPHERD

Meredith, we need to talk.

FADE OUT

End of Teaser

FADE IN

Ext. outside on a snowy night

MEREDITH

‘Tis the season to be jolly, they say. But for some people it’s not that easy. At the happiest and so-called joyous of times, like Christmas, some people are literally at their worst. Take yesterday, small children recovering from multiple stab wounds. Or putting up with family you just can’t stand with every fiber of your being during the holidays. Or just figuring out what the heck to do with a new person in your life.

CHRISTINA

So, what did McDreamy have to say? Are wedding bells in your future?

MEREDITH

First, his name is Derek, and no. He told me he hasn’t decided if he’s willing to take a chance on me again. And I get it, I’m literally a walking disaster. I guess I should have jumped at the chance when he gave it to me. And apparently he kissed some nurse named Rose. But, but….it’s okay. It was a “thank-you” kiss, whatever that means.

CHRISTINA

Rose? Ok, what kind of name is that? Like ring-around-the? No, that’s not acceptable. You laid down the law. You said you didn’t want him seeing anyone else, and I believe that includes kissing. And what is a “thank-you” kiss?

MEREDITH

Your guess is as good as mine.

CHRISTINA

I bet Miss Tulip was “thanking” McDreamy for him being on this planet, his flowing mane and captivating soul windows…

MEREDITH

Ha, ha very funny. Not the kind of sarcasm I need right now.

CHRISTINA

Just saying. And I’m sure asking about your so-called sister will just be the delicious cherry on top of your amazing mood.

MEREDITH

Complicated to say the least. That night when you invited her over kind of changed things.

CHRISTINA

Now what did I do?

MEREDITH

Well, I think there’s a wall that’s been broken down. There’s less awkwardness now – I mean I’m still 100 percent awkward – but that night at the dance party at our house when we were drunk, we talked.

CHRISTINA

Continue…

MEREDITH

Stuff…work stuff, family stuff, the stuff you blab on about after six tequila shots before the night goes hazy. This isn’t very me to say, but she’s actually a very deep, caring human being. TBD on what to do about Dad – he keeps drinking and going out so we’re going to first steal all his booze while he’s away. A little sisterly bonding if you will.

CHRISTINA

Well, sounds like it wasn’t all doom and gloom for the Grey sisters. Maybe now she’ll be a little less annoying in rounds.

MEREDITH

It’s okay, she’s my half sister not full.

End of Scene I

Ext. in the hospital exam room visiting a patient – morning

MEREDITH

Well, after several lab tests it looks like you have hemolytic anemia, meaning there aren’t enough red blood cells in your body. It was probably caused because your bone marrow was unable to make up for the destruction of the red blood cells which then meant it tried to create more, but couldn’t create enough. It’s not life-threatening, but you’ll need just a few medications. The nurses will take you through all the details, but really Mr. Robinson, you need to let your wife know if you’re not feeling well, okay? If you need anything, you know where to find me.

Meredith leads the patient out the door to see Dr. Shepherd walking by; she stops him.

MEREDITH

So, how’s your day going? Has it been a great day to save lives?

DEREK

I know you’re not actually asking about my day, but yes it has been. And no, I haven’t made any decisions.

MEREDITH

Meaning?

DEREK

Meaning I haven’t decided anything yet. Let me take my time. Not to sound harsh, but I waited a long time for you. Now it’s your turn to wait.

He leaves Meredith in confusion.

End of Scene II.

MEREDITH (V/O)

Christmas is full of joy as it is sadness. We remember times from long ago with family and friends, gathered around the tree opening presents with pure joy and delight. As we grow older, we realize times aren’t the same, and we realize not everyone we love is still with us.

Ext. hospital – evening.

MEREDITH

Uh….hey. So, what are your plans for Christmas?

LEXIE

I’m not sure yet. Dad’s thinking about going somewhere warm where there’s bottomless mimosas, so TBD for me.

MEREDITH

Well, I’m not sure about mine either. But, I mean in the spirit of Christmas, you can hang with us…if you want. Christina and I are doing a thing for Christmas at our place. If you want.

LEXIE

Thanks, I think I might just do that.

MEREDITH

Okay, well, cool.

Meredith exits, Lexie is left with a bemused smile.

End of Act I.

FADE OUT

FADE IN

Ext. Sixth grader’s hospital room – evening.

MEREDITH

Hey, Charlie! How ya doin’?

CHARLIE (patient who recently received new ears, stabbed in lock down)

Just fine. My sides only hurt a little bit now. At least I have these cool scars to show my friends!

MEREDITH

You always see the glass half full, don’t you?

CHARLIE

I’m not sure what that means, but sure!

MEREDITH

It means you always see the bright side of the problem.

CHARLIE

Then yes, I do. Well most of the time I try to. But sometimes it’s hard, especially during Christmas. My dad died last year around this time and it makes me sad to think about it.

MEREDITH

It’s alright to be sad sometimes – you don’t always have to be happy.

CHARLIE

I know, but it’s kind of embarrassing to tell people you’re sad, and it’s definitely not cool to cry. Are you ever sad?

MEREDITH

Lucky for you, you are talking to the queen of emotional roller coasters. Of course I’m sad sometimes. You and I are kind of alike you know, I lost my mom awhile ago and sometimes that makes me feel….well, we’ll call it sad.

CHARLIE

I’m really sorry. (takes Meredith’s hand)

MEREDITH

Thanks, me too. But instead of being sad, sometimes I think of…the good times (while few and far between).

FLASHBACK: Shows Meredith, Mom and Dad opening presents together. They sip hot chocolate after watching “White Christmas.”

End of Scene II

Ext. in operating room preparing for surgery – morning

DEREK

So, how’s it going Rose?

ROSE

Is this really the time you should be asking that? You know you’re about to go exploring in someone’s brains, right?

DEREK

Just asking!

ROSE

Okay then, I’m fine I suppose. How are you?

DEREK

Yet to be decided….

ROSE

How cryptic. Care to explain further?

DEREK

Alright, well first I wanted to talk to you about something that happened between us….maybe a few days ago….outside the OR.

ROSE

Ah, the elusive “kiss.”

DEREK

Precisely. What did that mean to you?

ROSE

Well, I think it was the heat-of-the-moment type of thing. Now I know we don’t know each other THAT well, but I’m a very passionate person. When I feel something, I really feel it.

DEREK

Yes, I could definitely feel your feeling (smiling).

ROSE

So now that we’ve got that cleared up, how are you feeling?

DEREK

Well, I really like this amazing girl…wow, that sounded so high school.

ROSE

Hmmm…this couldn’t possibly be none other than superstar intern Meredith Grey perhaps?

DEREK

Is it really that obvious? But here’s the dilemma: I had been waiting for her to figure out what she wanted, for us to be together. Now that she knows, I’m not so sure I do.

ROSE

Complex, man. Okay so here’s what I would do. First, be a man and go talk to her, let her know what’s up. Then, consider your options. The question that really needs to be answered, is “is she really worth it?”

DEREK

Rose, I never knew you were so….

ROSE

Intuitive? Amazing?

DEREK

(Smiles) Yes, those and so relationship-savvy. You’re no stranger to love, are you? Thanks for your help. I’ll see how that goes, if not I know who to blame.

End of Act II

Stay tuned for more! Closing with a memorable quote from our favorite television Meredith:

“Just because we can live without something, it doesn’t mean we have to.”

I’m sure referring to the massive amounts of Christmas cookies I couldn’t live without eating this weekend.

Peace, love and Grey’s Anatomy ❤

 

 

Change is Good, Mostly

changes-comingStarting college, everyone talks about working towards a first job. That job will be the start to your career, the first step down the yellow brick professional road. You’ll make an abundance of friends, professional contacts and maybe even a spouse along the way.

But what isn’t mentioned, is when you lose that job.

Now rest assured I have not yet lost my professional job. I’m not under the impression that I’m exempt from this situation. It seems companies left and right are downsizing for a variety of reasons. Workforce reductions seem to be driven by difficulties in emerging markets, resulting fluctuations in global currencies, efficiencies in corporate processes, etc. Reasons aside, workforce reductions appear to be a necessary even natural part of any organization. Organizations experience organic growth as influenced by internal and external factors. As I’m pursuing my master’s degree, I’m learning more about different strategies organizations employ to communicate change within the company to internal and external audiences.

I wish those case studies outlined how to communicate to friends, coworkers and families about job loss.

Every part of communicating a job loss to another person is difficult. It’s navigating the difficult conversations like the introduction, explanation or conclusion into what you’re doing now. Honestly, I could write novels about communicating corporate change after all I’ve read, learned and experienced.

I’m writing about this because it never crossed my mind at my first day of work that I might lose that job, and I would hate for the misinterpretation of reality to cloud anyone else’s perspective. It would be a disservice to undergraduate students not to discuss this possibility, how to recover and communicate this situation to others. Your first job is about maintaining optimism while understanding the internalizing the realities. It’s upsetting to think that new fresh-faced, bright-eyed undergrads even have to consider this, but to survive in the yo-pro world, you do.

P.S. Below are a few things related to the topic that I like. Read on.

Forbes: The Strategic Narrative – A Better Way to Communicate Change

Thomas Friedman: The World is Flat

 

Did You Get My Email?

“I’m sure it’s buried somewhere in my email…”

seo-meme-14

I never understood the true burden of email until I started a professional job. Sure, I used Gmail at school for projects, editing newspaper articles and getting Google alerts. The closest I came to being buried in my email was receiving maybe 20 plus drafts of newspaper articles ready to review, and I thought that was worrying to sift through. Accomplishment and relief arrived when I could get my inbox down to 0 unread. Also, let’s not forget the cutesy email we used in grade school to set up Myspace accounts.

Nevertheless, there I sat Monday reviewing emails for a good portion of my morning. Let me clarify, I am not in a senior position at work and am hardly as busy as someone twice my age. I think my mother has more than 5,000 unread emails and I’m probably low-balling that. However, this process is new to me and I find it overwhelming quite frankly.

Just seeing the number of emails is intimidating, let alone trying to answer them. Honestly most of the time it’s “please see the cc’d above for assistance” or “yes, I can get you access to that.” There are also times when people send you emails and you think, really? You sit literally 10 feet away from me and couldn’t have resolved this with a quick visit or phone call. Spoiler alert, email can be used as a vehicle for passive aggressive behavior and conflict avoidance. Many people in the working world don’t have a grasp of choosing the right communication for their message. I am no master, but my experience in the communication field has helped me understand when to use what medium. 

Glaring at your inbox and willing it to reduce doesn’t work. So you have to read and maybe reply. Receiving an email that simply says “ok thanks” without proper capitalization or punctuation at first startled me. My grammar isn’t always perfect, but my journalism background kept my tied to an AP Stylebook for many years. Concern would wash over me, as to why the sender didn’t carefully craft an email to me as I would them. Months into my job I realized that for the most part, they weren’t being rude – they were being efficient. I still value thoughtful, carefully-considered emails in which my recipient feels like I took more than five seconds to write it. Immediate worry doesn’t fill my mind now when I see a terse email from a coworker, usually.

And on another note, apparently millennials aren’t into emails.

And for just a few more chuckles, tell me this isn’t your office. 

Writing about emails just makes me stressed about looking at tomorrow’s arrivals.

Finding Friends as Yo-Pro

Writer’s note: My thoughts are not representative of the entire yo-pro community, only voiced to provide insight into the daily struggles of a post graduate. 


“Every new friend is a new adventure…the start of new memories.”

– Patrick Lindsay

Let me set the scene for you. Graduating college, I had a solid group of best friends that I could rely on. Some were at school, others still in my hometown. Outside of that circle were more friends, not best friends, but ones I would be comfortable chatting a bar with over a casual drink.

Once out of college, my group of best friends went on their merry, separate ways. Two were doing a “victory lap” to finish up their degrees, and the other two went to their respective homes in search of jobs. Me, moving to another city slightly away from home, started a marketing career and began my current life as a yo-pro.

My situation might be unique in that I moved to a city where I knew few people at a company I had worked two years prior. This city might I add, not necessarily a booming metropolis. In my current role, my team consists of a middle-aged Indian woman (my super boss), four young dads (one of which is my direct boss), a recent (ish) college graduate, and an older woman. While this group of people is extremely friendly and personable at work, it’s safe to say that no one is texting me on weekends to go grab a drink. You might say wait, you said a college graduate was in your group! Yahtzee! You would be correct; however, said recent college graduate rarely attended social events and focused most of his time on work. The struggle is in my role, I almost only interact with this group of people despite the company employing almost 46,000 people worldwide. The struggle is real.

My recent endeavors to gain friends have included: joining a gym (yes, JOINING A GYM), swimming at 5:30 in the morning, going to lunches where I know almost no one, attending conferences that barely touch my daily job responsibilities, etc. While this might not seem like extreme tasks, they’re certainly difficult. I am not a morning person.

I am certainly not a reclusive person so don’t get those ideas in your head. I enjoy having a balanced social life – where I can feel comfortable going out with friends on weekends and sharing who my recent crushes are but also spend time at home devouring a season of Gilmore Girls on Netflix. I am social, outgoing, friendly – the whole nine yards. I still have my group of best friends, although we are in different states.

So I ask you fellow yo-pros, what have you done to make friends in your new roles?

Greetings from Corporate America

You might be asking yourself, “What is a yo-pro?” Is it a professional yo-yoer? A professional youngster? Close, but no cigar. A yo-pro is a young professional – someone I personally define as a one who is in the 20s working among millions in corporate America. These yo-pros are often recent college graduates, working in their first full-time position, and almost always still growing their business casual wardrobe (This might not seem important, but it is, trust me).

A yo-pro often lives alone with an adorable pet or a slightly annoying roommate(s) to achieve minimal monthly payments to afford more trips to the local bar. Thriftiness also inspires a love of all free things in yo-pros, including but not limited to food, exercise classes, alcohol beverages, furniture from coworkers, etc. While thrifty, yo-pros can often spend a considerable amount of money furnishing their meager apartment, buying adorable outfits for adorable pets, traveling on the weekends to visit friends, and of course, booze. It’s common for a new yo-proer to spend ample time on Netflix after a long day of work, which you realize, is actually very long.

See Urban Dictionary to verify my perspective

The hours before the post-grad struggles began.

The hours before the post-grad struggles began.

Now you might be asking yourself, “Ok, so who is this self-proclaimed yo-pro?” Well, that’s simple. I’m a recent graduate of the best place on earth, THE University of Dayton.

The photo you see to the right is just hours before I became a post-grad, as the cap and gown might indicate. Those were the happy days, the celebratory days, and definitely the care-free days.

All of these traits describe myself, and many family members, friends and strangers across the globe.Keep in mind these experiences are not reflective of every yo-pro, just my fabulous life. As I’ve been embraced into the yo-pro-hood (the livelihood that is a yo-pro), I’ve encountered many struggles, MANY struggles. But I’ve also picked up a thing or two along the way. This blog will include my post-grad wins, failures, embarrassments, and maybe a rants after a few glasses of cheap wine. Don’t like dry sarcasm? Better stay away.

I didn’t choose the yo-pro life – the yo-pro life chose me.

Lovingly,

Meredith